Software is Irrelevant


Charles McCrumb Human Workflow Developer, Small Business IT Project Analyst, Office Automation Expert Herbert, McCrumb & Associates
Charles McCrumb
Human Workflow Developer, Small Business IT Project Analyst, Office Automation Expert
Herbert, McCrumb & Associates

Well, not completely irrelevant, but in a major way at least, systems are broken.

In my experience, here’s why.

When I first became involved with Information Systems (1994), there were businesses that had computers and those that did not. Those businesses with computer systems had a clear advantage over their paper process competition.

These days, everyone has access to computers and software (even free, or nearly free software with Gmail, Google Docs, Dropbox, etcetera).

How are you going to leverage your business against your competition (or your own career) now?

You’ve got to change the behavior of the people (or yourself)!!!

We don’t work for the machines yet, so there’s still time to¬†leverage our humanity.
More on that later.

Cheers! ūüėé

Charles McCrumb
Human Workflow Developer, Small Business IT Project Analyst, Office Automation Expert
Herbert, McCrumb & Associates
We can make ANY business work BETTER!
Small Business IT Projects  |  Office Automation  |  Workflow Behaviors
Visit us at http://www.hm-associates.com
Like us on Facebook for instant updates on what Herbert, McCrumb & Associates is doing, how we’re doing it, and how we’re saving real people time and money!
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email: charles@hm-associates.com
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Bus: (626) 593-6700

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Too Big of a Byte


Charles McCrumb Small Business IT Project Analyst, Office Automation Expert Herbert, McCrumb & Associates
Charles McCrumb
Small Business IT Project Analyst, Office Automation Expert
Herbert, McCrumb & Associates

Sorry for the pun, but it should read “Bite”.

I heard a hero of mine’s: (Tim Ferriss)¬†podcast recently with our mentor, Seth Godin.

http://fourhourworkweek.com/2016/02/10/seth-godin/

Seth writes a blog post EVERY DAY, and actually writes 4 or 5 each day, and selects what goes into the queue for publishing.

It occurs to me, that when I get a grand idea, I’ve been expecting myself to think up LOTS of material to¬†flesh it out completely. While a long blog post has value, and sometimes Seth posts some very long ones, a short note can also keep the flow going.

From now on, I’ll try to emulate Seth and keep them to a much smaller bite.

Cheers! ūüėé

Charles McCrumb
Small Business IT Project Analyst, Office Automation Expert
Herbert, McCrumb & Associates
We can make ANY business work BETTER!
Small Business IT Projects  |  Office Automation  |  Workflow Behaviors
Visit us at http://www.hm-associates.com
Like us on Facebook for instant updates on what Herbert, McCrumb & Associates is doing, how we’re doing it, and how we’re saving real people time and money!
http://www.facebook.com/HerbertMcCrumbAssociates
email: charles@hm-associates.com
Skype: charles.mccrumb
Bus: (626) 593-6700

Weekly-Biweekly Workflow


Charles McCrumb Office Automation Expert Herbert, McCrumb & Associates
Charles McCrumb
Small Business IT Project Analyst, Office Automation Expert
Herbert, McCrumb & Associates

In a recent post, Seth Godin wrote “Double and half (freelancer math)”¬†essentially¬†what freelancers need to be doing with half of their time is getting better at what they do.

If half your time is spent getting better at what you do (and I believe you should spend it that way), that other half of your time needs to be¬†spent actually working on projects, and¬†introducing yourself to people. I think you should instead of daily working on ALL of¬†these things (and making yourself crazy in the process), you should do these things¬†weekly¬†in order¬†to develop a weekly-biweekly workflow. Here’s what I mean:

[Sample weekly-biweekly schedule]
Spend Monday introducing yourself to prospective clients, when you get home or back to your office, send a thank you email to the people that you made connections with and communicate with your network. Tuesday, develop some systems. FOCUS EXCLUSIVELY on systems or homework. Wednesday meet more people, and thank them, communicate. Thursday develop systems. Friday meet more people, and thank them, communicate.

Weekends, spend time with your family!

The next week, reverse the schedule:
Monday develop systems; Tuesday meet people, communicate; Wednesday develop systems, Thursday meet people, communicate; Friday develop systems.

That’s a nice weekly-biweekly flow where you won’t feel too rushed, but will get some things accomplished. Over 2 weeks, you spent 5 days developing systems, and 5 days meeting people and communicating. Of course, a project or projects will mess with this schedule a bit.

If you are working for someone else, (not freelancing, or consulting) ask your boss if you can try something similar, by grouping some of your tasks into day-long efforts. Show her this post if you like. There really is no such thing as multitasking. It’s fractional-tasking at best, and the more you do it, the more scatterbrained and worse you get at it. Working all day at a work function (or similar work functions) can REALLY break loose a clogged workflow!

Cheers! ūüėé

Charles McCrumb
Small Business IT Project Analyst, Office Automation Expert
Herbert, McCrumb & Associates
We can make ANY business work BETTER!
Small Business IT Projects | Office Automation | Human Behaviors
Visit us at http://www.hm-associates.com
Like us on Facebook for instant updates on what Herbert, McCrumb & Associates is doing, how we’re doing it, and how we’re saving real people time and money!
http://www.facebook.com/HerbertMcCrumbAssociates
email: charles@hm-associates.com
Skype: charles.mccrumb
Bus: (626) 593-6700